Close Menu
KOMahonyLaw - Law Office of Kevin P. O'Mahony
Healthcare, Business
& Litigation Services

Restrictive Covenants & Non-Compete Agreements

At the Law Office of Kevin O’Mahony, we represent healthcare providers, businesses and professionals with regard to restrictive covenants. Our law firm reviews, prepares, negotiates and litigates:

  • Non-Compete agreements
  • Non-Solicitation agreements
  • Confidentiality agreements
  • Employment agreements containing restrictive covenants
  • Severance agreements containing restrictive covenants
  • Settlement agreements containing restrictive covenants

Restrictive covenants are generally used to protect an employer or business owner(s) from unfair competition by an employee who potentially could take patients, other employees or confidential or proprietary information with him or her upon departure from the employer, practice or business. Employment agreements that contain properly drafted restrictive covenants, including non-compete agreements, non-solicitation agreements and confidentiality agreements, are essential to adequately protect employers and business owners’ intellectual property and other proprietary rights. Medical groups, for example, often use restrictive covenants to protect their owners’ investments in individual physicians and other healthcare providers, by encouraging them to remain employed with the medical group, or at least not compete with them in their service area for a specified period after they leave.

One of the first questions often posed by an employer, business owner, seller, partner, employee or former employee to an attorney is: “Is this non-compete agreement (or other restrictive covenant) enforceable?” Unfortunately in Georgia, rarely is the correct answer just a simple “yes” or “no.” It most cases, it will depend upon the particular facts and circumstances.

Enforceability of restrictive covenants has been a heavily litigated issue for many years due to public policy concerns, such as an individual’s right to earn a living in his or her chosen profession, and (in the medical realm) a patient’s right of access to the physician or other healthcare provider of his or her choice. Moreover, Georgia courts have historically been particularly skeptical of overreaching restrictive covenants in the healthcare arena. Consequently, restrictive covenant clauses that are too broad risk being deemed unreasonable and unenforceable. Additionally, the federal Stark law places restrictions on the use of restrictive covenants in physician recruitment activities.

So the mere existence of an “agreement” does not necessarily mean that it is valid or enforceable. Proper assessment of the enforceability of a restrictive covenant requires careful evaluation of numerous factors. A court typically will evaluate the reasonableness of a restrictive covenant based upon its duration (time), geographic scope (territory), and the scope of the prohibited activity.

The best way to assess whether a covenant’s duration, territory or scope of restricted activities will likely be viewed by a judge as reasonable is through legal research and analysis of court decisions that involve similar facts. The process of finding and properly evaluating such decisions (most of which are factually and legally complex and require careful review) is often time-consuming and difficult, if done correctly. But when the financial stakes are sufficiently large, retaining qualified counsel to perform these tasks is well worth the expense.

In late 2010, Georgia enacted a new law, the Georgia Restrictive Covenants Act (“RCA”), which made it easier to enforce non-compete clauses entered into on or after May 11, 2011. The RCA includes several provisions that have led to significant changes in drafting and litigating non-competition agreements in Georgia. Most of the changes are considered more favorable to employers than employees. For example, courts may now “blue pencil” agreements (i.e., modify or re-write overly broad contract provisions to render them enforceable). Courts may also evaluate non-compete and non-solicitation agreements separately, and enforce one without regard to the enforceability of the other. And “confidential information” is now defined in such a way as to enhance the enforceability of non-disclosure provisions.

The RCA also includes some provisions that favor employees. For instance, lower level employees may be exempt from particular provisions of the law, if they do not have certain skills, abilities, customer (client or patient) contacts or confidential information. Also, an employee can demand clarification of a restrictive covenant, and the employer must respond within 30 days. And a failure by the employer to respond to such a demand can be considered against the employer by a court. Overall, however, the RCA has made it somewhat easier for employers to enforce restrictive covenants against employees in Georgia – although the case law is only slowly developing, and the precise contours of the law remain unpredictable.

Despite the inherent uncertainty, based on our extensive experience in this area, we can assess the strengths and weaknesses of your restrictive covenants, and provide helpful, effective guidance, to inform your decision-making process and develop the best strategy. We understand that for employers and business owners, it is critical to protect your practice or business. And for individual healthcare providers and employees, we can help protect your current and future rights.

We have many years’ experience drafting, negotiating, enforcing and litigating employment and other contracts containing non-competition, non-solicitation, confidentiality, anti-piracy and trade secrets provisions for healthcare and business clients in Alpharetta, Duluth, Johns Creek and the metro Atlanta area. So if you need help with a non-compete agreement or other restrictive covenant in Georgia, please contact us.

© 2018 Law Office of Kevin P. O'Mahony. All rights reserved.
This law firm website is managed by Proven Law Marketing.

Site Map | Disclaimer